Cal OES INSIDE LOOK: Protect Your Home From Wildfire


May 19, 2017 2:13 pm

You’ve heard the term “defensible space,” but what does that really mean? We’ll cut through the weeds and show you how we do it. California’s firefighting mutual aid system moves faster than you think. And, goats could save your life – we’ll explain how.

Resources:

Cal OES My Hazards

CALFIRE: Why 100′?

Defensible Space Flier

Defensible Space Brochure

Homeowners Defensible Space Checklist

 


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Mono County, Tule River Tribe added to California Major Disaster Declaration for February Storms


May 19, 2017 11:00 am

One California county and a federally recognized Tribe impacted by severe winter storms in February 2017, which were not part of the original Disaster Declaration, can now apply for federal disaster assistance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced today.

At the request of the State, FEMA amended the Major Disaster Declaration signed by President Trump on April 1 to include Mono County and the Tule River Tribe in Tulare County. The Amendment was approved May 18. Mono County and the Tule River Tribe were excluded from the original disaster declaration because damages suffered from the storms were still being calculated.

State agencies, local and Tribal governments, as well as certain private nonprofit organizations, located in Mono County, which sustained damage during severe winter storms from Feb. 1 to Feb. 23, 2017, have 30 days to … continue reading »


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Cal OES Law Enforcement Branch: Answering the Call Since 1960


May 18, 2017 6:47 pm

Whether it’s a major wildfire or a search and rescue mission, the Cal OES Law Enforcement Branch is there. Providing valuable services to California’s law enforcement agencies is the call the Cal OES Law Branch has answered for 57 years.

During emergencies, Cal OES Law Branch plays a critical role coordinating mutual aid resources local jurisdictions need to help them respond to an emergency. This coordination of law enforcement officers from jurisdictions all around the state is through the Law Enforcement Mutual Aid (LEMA) system.

Most recently, the Cal OES Law Enforcement Branch has been involved in major events like the Erskine Fire in Kern County, Oroville Dam Emergency in Butte County, Super Bowl 50, numerous Search and Rescue missions including the rescue of missing hiker Cody Michael, Butte Fire in Calaveras County, Boles Fire in the … continue reading »


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Professor Honored for Seismic Safety Contributions


May 16, 2017 3:42 pm

Tsunami expert Lori Dengler has just been named the recipient of the 2017 Frank Press Public Service Award for her “exceptional leadership as a scientist, writer, educator, communicator and advocate of tsunami research and preparedness,” according to a Humboldt State University announcement on Friday. Cal OES’s Kate Long says Lori is part of the Cal OES Earthquake and Tsunami Program through a contract with Humboldt State University (NTHMP-funded).  RCTWG is also one of the founding organizations making up the Earthquake Country Alliance (ECA); the cross-sector, cross-region networking coalition Cal OES organizes and supports; ECA/RCTWG is pivotal in grassroots organizing for tsunami awareness week and the great California shakeout. RCTWG has also served as the model by which other regional ECA Group’s have formed. CAL OES Eq/Tsu Program was also one the three organizations that nominated … continue reading »


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Watch Where You Step


May 12, 2017 1:53 pm

There have been many stories in the media recently about rattlesnake sightings and even more frightening about victims of rattlesnake bites. In the past few weeks alone, several Search and Rescue (SAR) teams have been deployed to rescue bite victims stranded in rural areas.

This winter’s rains have led to a lot of vegetation growth, which attracts rattlesnake prey such as mice and other rodents, which means a very active rattler season. With an abundance of food to feast on, snakes will be able to survive longer and therefore people will see more of them.

Rattlesnakes are widespread in California and are found in a variety of habitat throughout the state from the coast to the desert. If you enjoy outdoor activities, you and your pets may be at risk for encountering rattlesnakes.

While generally not aggressive, rattlesnakes … continue reading »


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Warm Weather Ahead, Repairing Roads a Priority from Fallout of Winter Storms


May 11, 2017 3:36 pm

Editor’s Note: This updated version reflects the current figures for road repairs and cost breakdown from winter storms as of May 11, 2017, according to Caltrans. The original story was published on March 15, 2017.

 

Relentless winter storms caused flooding, threats of levee breaches and severe weather across California throughout January and February. While precipitation was much needed after six-plus years of drought, the endless amount of rain and snow in such a short timeframe created public safety concerns.

Most of the wet weather was triggered by atmospheric river storms – waves of moisture that move north from tropical areas and over the West Coast. Recovery from the storms is ongoing and will be a long-term process.

Among the concerns from the storm fallout is significant road damage, specifically in the Sierras. Caltrans District 3, which … continue reading »


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Going Nuclear with Cal OES’s Radiological Preparedness Unit


May 9, 2017 8:30 am
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In this episode (28) we talk with Bill Potter, Senior Emergency Services Coordinator for the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. He’s been with Cal OES for 15 years, all with the Radiological Preparedness Unit as lead for the Nuclear Power Plant program.

In 1979, following the accident at Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania, the California State Legislature mandated that the California Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES), together with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and affected counties, investigate the consequences of a serious nuclear power plant accident. Based on site-specific studies in 1980, Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) around the plant sites were established in detail and integrated plans were developed. Legislation mandating the NPP program has been continuous since 1979, enacted as Government Code and Health and Safety Code sections, called the Radiation Protection Act.

Bill Potter Instructs Diablo Canyon Ingestion Pathway Exercise Participants

​The Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Program covers emergency planning issues related to the State’s one operating nuclear power plant – Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). The NPP program also continues coordination with one decommissioning nuclear power plant – San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and two retired nuclear power plants – Humboldt Bay Nuclear Power Plant and Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station. The NPP program works with federal, state, local and utility officials in emergency planning, training and exercises to test emergency readiness. Together, through these combined preparedness efforts, the State of California provides reasonable assurance that appropriate measures can be taken to protect the health and safety of the public in the event of a radiological emergency at a nuclear power plant.

Bill Potter Boarding the USS Scranton SSN-756, San Diego, April 2017

Prior to coming joining Cal OES Potter spent 20 years in the US Air Force attached to many units including AFTAC, Nuclear Detection, Collection, and Analysis. He was a seismic systems maintenance technician, Airborne Scientific Laboratory Technician (SEO), DLI Arabic Language grad, and RSO at McClellan Central Lab.

Links

Cal OES NPP Program

Diablo Canyon Power Plant


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