Traveling for Thanksgiving? You’re Not Alone

According to AAA, more Californians will be traveling more than 50 miles from home this Thanksgiving holiday than in the past 9 years. So, you should expect our roads to be extremely busy and congested.

With all those cars, the CHP reminded us today that there will be extra officers on the highways, the importance of wearing seat belts, avoid speeding and not to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol or when sleepy.

“Buckling up is simple and the most important safety measure you can take to protect yourself in a collision,” CHP Commissioner Joe Farrow said. “Seat belts save lives and prevent injuries. Do not put your own life at risk, or the life of your family or friends.  Buckle up.”

In addition to this sound advice, there are a few other steps you can take to help make your trip less stressful and arrive at your destination without incident.

  • Have your vehicle inspected by a mechanic before making long-distance trips.
  • Plan your trip in advance. Whether you’re using a GPS system or a traditional map, review your travel route and be prepared for busy roads.
  • Let friends and family know your travel route and your anticipated arrival time.
  • Have emergency contact information easily accessible, such as roadside assistance, relatives, and hotel phone numbers.
  • Keep a cell phone and charger with you at all times.
  • Be sure to have an emergency kit in your car with water and food, prescription medicines, blankets, and items unique to your family. In the event of an emergency, help may not be immediately available. By having an emergency kit in a vehicle, a person can survive until help arrives.
  • Finally, stay up to date on the latest local forecast at www.weather.gov or mobile.weather.gov. California is a large state with varying climates and during the winter months the weather can be unpredictable.

With a little preparation, you can leave the road-trip stress at home and enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday. Safe travels!

Robb Mayberry

Robb Mayberry is a Public Information Officer for the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. He has assisted in the response and recovery efforts with some of California’s worst disasters, including the San Refugio Oil Spill, the Valley and Butte Wildfires, Aliso Canyon Gas Leak, Erskine Fire, and the Winters Storms of 2017. Prior to public service, he spent 25 years managing the public and media relations for some of Northern California’s largest healthcare organizations.

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